Nicholas a 2016 calendar boy

ONE DAY AT A TIME: Nicholas with his big sister Kaitlin. Proceeds from the sale of Nicholas’ calendar will go towards his therapy expenses.VICTORIA Point’s Nicholas Randall is a little boy with big needs, and his mother Kim Braddock has produced a 2016 calendar to help raise funds for his therapy.
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Nicholas is all smiles.

Born 10weeks premature, Nicholas has quadriplegia cerebral palsy, which affects his limbs, breathing and vision.Just after his fifth birthday, he suffered his first seizure and was also diagnosed with epilepsy.

Ms Braddock said her sonrequired intense therapy, some of which had been undertaken overseas, and he neededthe community’s help to keep up his treatment. She said next year, funds raised by the calendar would go towards his speech therapy.

Ms Braddock thanked the many local businesses that had supported thecalendar,which has photos of Nicholas enjoying life like any little boy wants to, only with the aid of multiple pieces of equipment, including standers, walkers, wheelchairs and more.

The calendar ($5) is available from Victoria Point businessesDrift In,Sharks Sporting Club andRay White,or by calling Ms Braddock on 0422 025 931.

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PM pledges $300m for drug treatment

Former addict Jake has got his life back on track through residential rehab. Photo: Wolter PeetersAlmost $300 million will be invested in the drug treatment sector as part of a new national plan that shifts focus from policing to prevention.
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Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull will unveil the federal government’s National Ice Taskforce report on Sunday, rolling out a four-year strategy of improved treatment, aftercare, education, prevention, support and community engagement to tackle the crystal meth issue.

The new prevention focus marks a significant shift away from the hardline law-and-order strategy that has long failed to stifle supply.

The minister responsible for drug and alcohol policy,Fiona Nash, said that after “significant investment” in policing borders and streets to combat ice supply, work was needed to “reduce demand” for the drug.

In April last year, former Prime Minister Tony Abbott announced a new taskforce which, headed by former former Victoria Police commissioner Ken Lay, united state and territory authorities in the ice strategy.

The response is a $241 million “boost” to the alcohol and drug treatment sector, with funding to be managed by the 31 Primary Health Networks set up by the Abbott government last year.

Asked if the funding was all new money, the minister’s spokesman said there was $297 “odd million” in fresh funding plus $15 million for advertising.

Matt Noffs, who as chief executive of the Noffs Foundation was part of the consultations, paid tribute to taskforce head Mr Lay, who he said was given “oxygen” by Malcolm Turnbull to take a “giant step forward.”

As the taskforce toured ice-ravaged communities starved of rehab services earlier this year, Mr Abbott’s own battle plan saw him announce the now infamous ‘dob-in-a-dealer hotline’ estimated to cost $1 million a year.

“It is my belief that Tony Abbott expected Ken Lay to say ‘we need more police’,” said Mr Noffs who added: “With Mr Turnbull as a conduit, Ken was far braver than that.”

Mr Lay has previous said: “Ice has been on the scene for over a decade and we’ve had a really strong law enforcement approach and it hasn’t resolved the problem. The time’s right now to look at the other options.”

“For social problems like these, law enforcement isn’t the answer. Unless you get into the primary prevention end, unless you stop the problem occurring you simply won’t arrest your way out of this.”

Almost $25 million will be set aside to arm families and communities with resources, information and support when ice issues emerge. A “key priority” of the plan will ensure that “indigenous-specific” and “culturally appropriate” mainstream treatment services are more widely available.

The action plan also includes significant investment in rural and regional areas, where the taskforce found specialist treatment services were few to non-existent.

Dr Lynne Magor-Blatch, executive officer of the Australasian Therapeutic Communities Association, expressed concern that the Government had chosen to distribute money through the PHNs which she described as “incredibly patchy”.

“Many are still in a changeover state from medicare locals and not properly developed,” she said, adding: “How are those resources going to flow through the PHNs when many would not even have relationships with the community organisations that are doing alcohol and other drug work?”

Drug treatment the key to young lives at crossroadsA fortnight ago, a Melbourne-based father was advisedthat if his 15-year-oldice-addicted son wanted professional treatment, he would be better off committing a crime in NSW – where a judge could at least offer him options.

“David has always suffered terrible anxiety issues and the drug issue became a way of self-medicating,” said Adam, whose real name has been withheld along with his son’s to protect theiridentities.

“This year, he stopped coming home. It started off as one night. Then became a week, two weeks. The police would locate him but as long as he claims he is OK, they are not permitted to bring him home. Even though he is still a child whose drug abuse is escalating.”

In recent times, David has been charged as an accessory to car theft, accessory to serious assault and broken police bail on 13 occasions.

“If there was any sort of mandatory treatment system in Victoria, Davidwould already have been directed to a facility tailored to help him. Instead, he is trapped in a cycle of abuse. This federal government funding announcement is fantastic news.”

Adam is currently trying to find a way of funnelling his son to an interstate residential treatment centre such asthe Sydney-based Program for Adolescent Life Management (PALM) run by the Matt Noffs Foundation.

In the coming years, government spending will be ploughed into a host of such programs tailored not only to youngsters hooked on ice, but across-the-board drug addiction.

Under an announcement by Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull,almost $300 million will be invested in the drug treatment sectoras part of a new national plan that shifts focus from policing to prevention.

On Friday,The Sun-Heraldmet Jake, an indigenous teenager whose life is back on track after two stints of residential therapy at PALM.

“I was in DOCS as a child because my mum and dad couldn’t look after me. I was exposed to smoking, alcohol and domestic violence. It wasn’t a great upbringing. By year 8, I wasn’t having such a great time. I experimented a little too much with drugs and fell into addiction.”

Like most kids in that position, he had “no real understanding” of what rehab was before he arrived.

“I pictured a white hospital with white corridors and beds, that type of scenery. It could not have been more different. It felt like a home.”

Jake, whose real name has been withheld,completed a three month stint at PALM last year. After falling back down the same path, he returned to the centre in early April. While he is the first to admit that rehab is no magic wand, he is proud of the changes and “improvements” in himself. Now 18, he has found a passion for public speaking and volunteering with indigenous children in primary schools.

“You learn a lot about yourself in therapy,” said Jake who added: “It’s given me a big boost.”

“When I’m about to fall into old habits, I have a reason to control it. I recognise the triggers. I also realise what my addiction was doing to those around me.”

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Quirky contest to decide names of new Nowra waterslides

The new slides are expected to open within the next three weeks. Picture: contributedShoalhaven council is offering a year’s worth of free rides to whoever can come up with the best names for Nowra’s new waterslides.
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Councilconstructed the slides as part of an upgrade toNowra Aquatic Park. They are due to open before Christmas.

MayorJoanna Gash has called on the community to put forward names foreach of the slides.

“The redeveloped Nowra Aquatic Park has proven to be extremely popular with the local communitysince being re-opened in September,” Cr Gash said.

“The new open tube and closed tube waterslides will provide yet another level of enjoyment.

“We are looking for original and fun names to help capture the vibrancy of the new slides.

“The winning entry will receive free slides for a year, giving the local community plenty of reasons to enter.”

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WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE: December 2006 – Part 2Photos

WALK DOWN MEMORY LANE: December 2006 – Part 2 | Photos More photos from the pages of the Daily Liberal in December 2006.
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Quartet combines for victory

LADIES at Horsham Golf Club got into the Christmas spirit on Thursday, taking part in the annual Christmas ambrose competition.
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In what is one of the most popular golfing events of the season, 81 players hit the links, making the most of perfect weather conditions.

Lorraine Melville, Donna O’Connor, Heather Greenaway and Kerrin Smith combined for an outstanding nett score of 58.5, which saw them ascend to the top of the leaderboard.

WINNERS: Lorraine Melville, Donna O’Connor, Heather Greenaway and Kerrin Smith. Picture: CONTRIBUTED

The partnership of Joyce Mills, Kerri Chamberlain and Leaane Taylor finished second, after it put together some solid golf to return a score of 60.37.

Bev Reynolds was dialled in on the difficult par-three second hole, finishing nearest-the-pin for the day.

Trudy Parker avoided bunkers guarding all four sides of the par-three fourth hole to claim bragging rights there.

Marg Moore navigated her way onto the putting surface on the 11thand was closest for the day, while Lil Payer fired a dart into the par-three 15th to win nearest-the-pin honours at the final par-three.

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Greater Northern CupPhotos

Greater Northern Cup | Photos Greater Northern Cup. Pictures PHILLIP BIGGS.
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Camperdown veteran takes out elite class

TOP RIDE: Lakes and Craters three-day event CCI three-star winner Seumas Marwood with 15-year-old Wild Oats. Picture: Vicky Hughson
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SEUMAS Marwood is more than familiar with Camperdown’s Lakes and Craters three-day event.

ThePakenham-based rider hasbeen making the trek to Camperdown “on and off” over the past 30 years, and over the weekend put in a strong showing to take out the CCI three-star class on his mount Wild Oats.

The pair have previously won the one-star class–going back “six or seven” years ago –and more recently finished runner-up in the three-star class in the Camperdown Horse Trials.

Marwood had not previously competed in the three-star class at the Lakes and Cratersevent, but went into the weekend’s competition with a clear plan of attack.

“I went there with three goals in mind,” he said.

“First, to win the class.

“Second, to win it with a score of under 60 –that puts you automatically on the nationals selection squad.

“Third, to get a score that would win it regardless of the size of the field.”

Marwood ticked all the boxes, finishing with a score of 50.8 –50.4 coming from his dressage, while he finished one second over in cross country and had clean jumps in the showjumping.

In his first competitionat Camperdown in 1986, Marwood –now 53 years old –said he had been inspired by Camperdown great and former Olympian Bill Roycroft.

“That was the last event Bill Roycroft rode in,” he said.

“He was 60 at the time. I’ve always drawn inspiration from Bill riding at that age. I’m not that old yet, but watching him compete still and be such strong rider at that age was inspiring.”

In other major classes, Tarryn Proctor won the CIC three-star class on ESB Irish Quest, Jacqui Bladier took out the CIC two-star on Ramirus and Callum Buczak won the CCI one-star on Joie du Lys.

Madeleine O’Callaghan won the CCI young rider one-star on Fernloch Allemande, Edith Kane took out the CCN105 on Maxicat and Hannah McLean won the CCN junior 105 on Incy Wincy Spider.

Lakes and Craters joint event secretary Jen Best said, with the introduction of a new 80-centimetre class to the international event, numbers were high over the four days.

“We had a very, very successful weekend,” she said.

“We were closer to record entries –there were 320 horses entered for the weekend.

“By adding that 80-centimetre class, we added an extra 110 riders.

“Barry Roycroft designed and built the new course for them. They had an absolute blast.”

Best said organisers had worked hard to incorporate the local community in the Lakes and Craters event.

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Letters to the editor

CULTURE: The Wagga land council understood the spiritual significance of the Wiradjuri Regional Aboriginal Land Council site.Be part of solution, not part of the problemIf Jason Jolley is prepared to look beyond the façade of the Wagga Wagga LocalAboriginal Land Council, he will quickly learn how land and connection is the key tohealing our young people (“Board has lost touch with city’s Indigenous issues”,December 2).
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The Wagga Wagga Local Aboriginal Land Council is more than just a physicalbuilding.

It has long been a meeting place for Wiradjuri people and is the spiritualhome of our Land Rights legends.

As a former Chair of the disbanded Wiradjuri Regional Aboriginal Land Council, I amwell-aware of the significance of that place to Aboriginal people in the region.

At the last meeting of the Wiradjuri Regional Aboriginal Land Council, I rememberwalking away from that building feeling as though we had lost a sense of belongingand community.

But the Wagga Wagga Local Aboriginal Land Council understood the cultural andspiritual significance of the land and put their heart and soul into revitalising the siteas a youth and community hub informed by history and culture.

CEO Lorraine Lyons has an open-door policy and anyone who steps inside thebuilding cannot help but be inspired by the memory of past Land Rights legends andthe vision the Local Aboriginal Land Council has for young Aboriginal people.

Lorraine Lyons is a passionate member of our community who came to the WaggaWagga Local Aboriginal Land Council with a strong track record in communityhousing.

She is not someone to turn her back on people in need, which makes ill-informedand personal attacks on her and the Wagga Wagga Local Aboriginal Land Councilso dispiriting.

Despite limited funding and with just two staff members to deliver programs andservices to members and the community, Wagga Wagga Local Aboriginal LandCouncil has established a number of initiatives including the BoxingCentre to keep our youth engaged and on a pathway to education.

Instead of negatively sniping from the sidelines, James Jolley should be a part of thesolution and support the Wagga Wagga Local Aboriginal Land Council’s positiveplans to use land, identity and culture to heal our young people.

Cr Craig Cromelin

NSW Aboriginal Land Council

Councillor for Wiradjuri Region

We have lost our freedom while dosing on the couchAshraf Fayadh, a Palestinian poet accused of renouncing Islam, was recently sentenced to death in Saudi Arabia. He has no legal representation.

Twenty-sevenmembers of a minor Islamic breakaway group within Islam are also awaiting probable death sentence in Sudan.

The prophet Muhammad favoured ruthless punishments –including amputations and death –for so-called apostasy.

So is Islam the outstanding example of suppression of freedom of thought?

No, there are others.

For example, see recent reports of death-for-conversion-away-from-Hinduism in modern India.

And also Tasmania….

Yes, Tasmania, where at this very moment the Catholic Archbishop of Hobart is looking at being dragged through an “anti-discrimination” tribunal for the crime of distributing to Catholic school parents a document explaining the Catholic understanding of marriage.

Australians tend to think of our culture being one of freedom of expression.

Sorry.

That changed a while ago while most of us were dosing in front of our TV set.

Arnold Jago

Nichols Point

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GALLERY: Giant-killers Centrals add Orange City to Royal Hotel Cup scalps

GALLERY: Giant-killers Centrals add Orange City to Royal Hotel Cup scalps CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Daryl Kennewell. Photo: MATT FINDLAY
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CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Jock Cartwright is dismissed as Centrals celebrate. Photo: MATT FINDLAY

CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Jack Dodds. Photo: MATT FINDLAY

CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Jock Cartwright. Photo: MATT FINDLAY

CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Jake Pauletto retires hurt. Photo: MATT FINDLAY

CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Ben Findlay. Photo: MATT FINDLAY

CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Jameel Qureshi. Photo: MATT FINDLAY

CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Daryl Kennewell. Photo: MATT FINDLAY

CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Dean Turner. Photo: MATT FINDLAY

CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Daryl Kennewell. Photo: MATT FINDLAY

CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Pat Giuffre. Photo: MATT FINDLAY

CENTRALS V ORANGE CITY: Zac Reimer. Photo: MATT FINDLAY

TweetFacebookCRICKETCENTRALS continued their giant-killing ways on Friday night, knocking off another Royal Hotel Cup heavyweight to claim their second consecutive Twenty20 win and earn guaranteed progression to the semi-finals.

Following their upset of last year’s runners-up Cowra a fortnight ago, Centrals stunned one-time T20 champions Orange City at Wade Park on Friday, producing a dominant performance to thump the Warriors by seven wickets.

The win gives the red and blacks a guaranteed place in the final four, with a game in hand, and also signals the first time the side has even looked like passing the group stage.

“It’s awesome, it really is,” Centrals T20 skipper Jake Pauletto beamed.

“That’s what we were hoping for, it’s what we came here for.

“We did ourselves proud out there in that one, particularly in the field.

“I think that was the difference between the two sides, we took our chances and Orange City didn’t.”

Batting first after stand-in skipper Jackson Coote won the toss, Orange City didn’t fire at all.

Openers Adam Cowden (1) and Jock Cartwright (7) went early, and the Warriors’ cause wasn’t helped when Daryl Kennewell (2-19) had marquee man Josh Toole caught behind for a second ball globe.

At that point, Orange City was reeling at 3-15.

Outside a fighting 30 from middle order bat Ben Findlay and a timely 24 from Coote in the lower order, the Warriors surrendered meekly, skittled for 114.

Outside Kennewell, Zac Reimer (3-23) continued his sterling T20 form and was the pick of Centrals’ bowlers.

In reply, once again Centrals’ marquee in Blayney’s Jameel Qureshi led the way, knocking up 60 not out in the chase, combining mainly with Josh Coyte (27 not out) to get the red and blacks over the line with seven wickets and two overs to spare.

“Jameel’s been a real rock for us, with 60-odd not out in both chases, he’s been handy,” Pauletto said.

“He’s great to have in the field too, with his ideas, experience and his positivity. I know the young blokes really look up to him too.”

Pauletto said considering his side had traditionally struggled in T20 cricket – that was the side’s third win in almost four seasons in the shortest format – Centrals would make the most of their form and were gunning for top spot in pool B.

“I’m not sure what’s changed from previous years, I think it was just a case of having not really won before, we weren’t sure how to do it,” he said.

“We got a sniff against Cowra and the attitude changed. I think the guys just figured out yes, we can do this.

“We’re looking to knock off CYMS Moroneys now in our last game, get three from three, finish first and get what should be an easier semi-final.”

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Another twist in Nate Jawai racist slur saga as NZ Breakers deny Perth Wildcats claims

Allegation: The Wildcats say racial abuse was directed at Nate Jawai during the Breakers game in New Zealand. Photo: Paul KaneFresh accusations have emerged that suggest we may not have heard the last of the alleged racist taunts controversy involving giant Perth Wildcats centre Nate Jawai and a NZ Breakers fan.
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The saga erupted after Wednesday night’s 99-78 victory by the Breakers over their NBL rivals at the North Shore Events Centre when Wildcats coach Trevor Gleeson told the post-game media conference Jawai had been racially abused by someone in the crowd.

“We’ll take that up with the league afterwards. It wasn’t pretty,” Gleeson said of an incident that saw him call for extra security behind his bench. “We don’t come here to get racially abused and we don’t want to see that in sport.”

But the following day the Wildcats appeared to distance themselves from the racial nature of the abuse allegations when they released a statement saying: “During the first half of Wednesday night’s loss to the Breakers … Jawai was taunted whilst being subbed out of the game.

“As this was an isolated incident limited to one person, Nate and the club have decided to move on and focus on Friday night’s home game against the Adelaide 36ers.”

Breakers chief executive Richard Clarke said he had been “disappointed” by the way the allegations were aired by Gleeson at the media conference, and not through any of the official channels available to him on the night.

He said he would be taking that up with both the league’s head office and the Wildcats organisation.

Clarke also conducted an extensive investigation into the allegations and said that had confirmed emphatically no racial abuse had taken place.

“Everything we’ve uncovered, all the responses from our members, from the Sky production crew, and from the NBL referees coach (sitting in the area concerned) are all backing up there wasn’t anything racial in what was said,” Clarke said.

He said the club’s fans had been “vindicated” by both the investigation and the Wildcats’ backtrack.

However, there appears to have been a further twist in the saga from the Wildcats on their return to Perth, or at least the threat of one.

According to The West Australian newspaper, there have been allegations the term “monkey” was directed at Jawai, the 2.08m, 140kg centre who is an indigenous Australian of Torres Strait Islander descent. A report in the newspaper said: “The Wildcats are adamant the term ‘monkey’ was used.”

Jawai said on his return to Perth he would leave the issue in the hands of the league. “It’s up to the NBL to do something about it. If not, I’m not worried about it any more,” he said.

However, the NBL has said it cannot conduct its own investigation unless a complaint is received.

Gleeson said after Friday’s home game against Adelaide, won 90-72 by the Wildcats, that the club would discuss the issue. “If Nate wants to take it further we’ll support him 100 per cent,” he said.

Gleeson indicated the full story had yet to come out. “It’s just Nate’s instant reaction, it’s not like his personality to do that straight away,” he said.

Stuff

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Teen critical, dozens of drug arrests at Stereosonic festival in Melbourne

Police used sniffer dogs as partygoers arrived at the Stereosonic festival in Melbourne. Photo: Craig SillitoeA teen remains in a critical condition after attending the Stereosonic festival in Melbourne as police arrested nearly 70 partygoers for drug offences.
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Six other people are suspected of overdosing on drugs at the festival held at the Flemington Showgrounds on Saturday, while a man died at a similar event in Adelaide – the second fatality linked to the popular dance event in the past week.

The latest death comes as Victoria is set to review the use of sniffer dogs and if drug-testing should be offered at events during the summer music festival season.

At the Melbourne event, a man in his late teens was taken to the Western Hospital, where he arrived in a critical condition, an Ambulance Victoria spokesman said.

Officers used drug sniffer dogs as thousands arrived at the event in Flemington, with 66 people arrested over a range of drug offences.

Only two were charged and bailed while two others are expected to be charged later on summons.

Most of those caught had taken ecstasy, although police also found amphetamines, cocaine and cannabis, a Victoria Police spokeswoman said.

Despite seven suspected overdoses, paramedics praised the large crowd that attended the Melbourne event.

“Most people heeded warnings about the risks of taking drugs, behaved responsibly and looked after their mates,” Ambulance Victoria State Health Commander Paul Holman said in a statement.

Stereosonic finishes its run on Sunday with an event in Brisbane.

Festival organisers said they were “devastated to hear of another loss to drugs” in a statement published on its Facebook page.

Just before 5pm on Saturday 5 December, Police were advised that a man was receiving treatment from paramedics at the…Posted by stereosonic on  Saturday, December 5, 2015This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

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New start discovered

VOLUNTEER: Berkeley mum Michelle Maltby volunteers at UOW’s Early Start Discovery Space while studying and running a family day care business. Picture: Paul JonesAt the age of 45 Berkeley mum Michelle Maltby is on a huge but thoroughly exciting learning curve.
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As avolunteer at UOW’s Early Start Discovery Space and a student studying for a degree in early childhood, Mrs Maltbyspends her weekends teaching others new skills, while at the same time she is also hitting the books undertaking her own studies.

A mum of two school aged children, Mrs Maltby began studying the new flexible Bachelor of Education –The Early Years, this year and soon decided to beginvolunteering at the newly opened discovery space.

As a younger woman, Mrs Maltby hadalways wanted to pursue teaching, but a steady job that saw her become a manager was too good to give up. It wasn’t untilshe was made redundant20 years later, that she decided the time was right to give teaching a go.

Enrolling in TAFE, she undertook a Diploma of Children Services, and decided to open up her own family day care business. But within a few years she realised shewanted more, and decided to give university a go.

Once on campus she was immediately drawn to theEarly Start Discovery Space. Watching it develop from rubble to a magnificent buildingwas inspirational and she couldn’t wait to be part of it.

“Iwas so attracted to it,” Mrs Maltby said. “It was like a beacon.”

“When they said they needed volunteers I applied straight away.It was so exciting to be there from the start.”

As thousands of people in the Illawarracelebrated International Volunteers Day on December 5, Mrs Maltby reflected on the satisfaction she has gained from giving up her time to help others most Sundays.

“To know you are helping someone, is just great.”

She relishes the opportunity to help childrendevelop their communication skillsand build confidence by encouraging them to engage in a range of activities.

She said she also loved the opportunity volunteering gave her to interact with children and their parents through play.

“At the discovery centre we want parents to play with their children, to climb through the stomach with the kids and put on a hat in the construction zone.

“Thatis somethingI really enjoy encouraging the parents to do.Most parents are very receptive to that.

“It’s an excellent environment to volunteer in. I get a lot of satisfaction.”

When she graduates Mrs Maltby hopes to runan early childhood education and care centre or become involved in government education policy development.

The Discovery Space currently has about 60volunteers, with more needed. Anyone interested in volunteering canvisitearlystartdiscoveryspace.edu419论坛.

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Car hits police officer at roadblock

A police constable was hit by a car at a roadblock on Gipps Road at Gwynneville on Saturday night. Picture: Adam McLeanA Shoalhaven police officerwas hit by a car at a Gwynnevilleroad block on Saturday night.
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The roadblock, which formed part of the road closures for the transportation of nuclear waste to Lucas Heights,was onGipps Road at the Princes Motorway overpass.

The driver of the blue Holden Astrawas travelling eastbound along Gipps Road at about 20km/h according to police when apolice officer called for him to stop.

Police allegehe failed to stop and hit the left knee of the officer,a senior constable from Shoalhaven LAC.

The officer then jumped on the bonnet of the car and rolled off the side.

Hesuffered only minor bruising from the incident.

When the car came to a stop, the officer arrested the driver.

Police will be taking further action over the incident and the driver will be attending court at a later date.

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